Frilled Standard Bind-Off
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Frilled Standard Bind-Off
bind-offs

If you’re using this bind-off on something where the edge will be stretched, the bind-off won’t frill but it will still look gorgeous. I recommend that you use this bind-off on any and all lace projects that you’ll be blocking.

At right you can see a photo of how this bind-off looks on a lace project: The Frilled Standard Bind-Off on a Feather-and-Fan lace swatch.

To see how this bind-off compares to other recommended bind-offs for lace, see Bind-Offs for Lace.

This bind-off gets its name from the Standard Bind-Off, to which an extra movement (which you might recognize from the Suspended Variation Bind-Off) is added.

To get the full effect on this and any frilled or ruffled bind-off, you’ll need to block this it: get it wet, squeeze the water out, and shape the edge with your fingers to make it into a frill.

Jeny’s Surprisingly-Stretchy Bind-Off (JSSBO) for 1×1 Rib
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Jeny’s Surprisingly-Stretchy Bind-Off (JSSBO) for 1×1 Rib
(JSSbind-offs

Lots of patterns suggest that you use this bind-off, and I agree. I would consider this bind-off “required reading” for intermediate-level knitters.

JSSBO would work well for the ribbing at the bottom of a top-down sweater or at the brim of a top-down hat — anywhere you want the bind-off to not look stretched-out.

This bind-off is also a great choice for binding off lace projects.

This bind-off was invented by Jeny Staiman and published in Knitty in Fall 2009.

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