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When To Start Your Fleegle Heel Increases (Where is the “Front of Your Ankle?”)

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When To Start Your Fleegle Heel Increases (Where is the “Front of Your Ankle?”)

Liat Gat - Founder

April 29, 2011

A big issue for first-time knitters of toe-up socks is knowing when to start increasing for the Fleegle heel. Where exactly is “the front of your ankle?” Here’s how to tell.

I happen to be knitting a pair of worsted-weight socks, toe-up of course, and thinking about my lovely knitting students and the problems they run into most often when knitting toe-up socks.

A big one for first-time knitters of my basic Toe-Up Socks for Magic Loop is knowing when to start increasing for the Fleegle heel. Fleegle describes the time to start increasing as “when the knitting reaches the front of your ankle.”

I don’t know about you, but my ankle has more of a gradual transition than a demarcation where my foot turns into my leg.

Start your Fleegle Heel increases when the knitting touches the front of your ankle
This is the spot your knitting should reach when you start your Fleele heel increases.

To overcome this issue, here’s what to do:

Flex your foot as much as you can (above) – this helps the “front of the ankle” become more apparent.

Pull the sock onto your foot (which of course is easy because you’re using Magic Loop), and hold it as snug as you’d like it when you’re wearing it. If the knitting reaches the crook in your ankle, you’re ready to start the Fleegle heel increases.

Here’s me trying on my sock – I’m ready to start my heel.

Use both hands to pull the sock on. You can see that my knitting is stretched snug and hits what, over time, I have come to judge as the front of my ankle.

If you’re not sure, better start increasing. Most people just learning this technique tend to wait too long to start the heel.

Don’t have the foot available? Use this chart: When to Start Your Fleegle Heel, Based On Shoe Size

Update: Watch a Video On How to Tell When to Start Increasing


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Further Resources:

If you liked this tutorial on when to start your fleegle heel increases, please add your comment!

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18 thoughts on “When To Start Your Fleegle Heel Increases (Where is the “Front of Your Ankle?”)”

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  1. I always have my foot with me so it’s no problem. (Snicker, snicker). Yes I know you were referring to making the socks for someone else. But I have to say here that your tutorials of knitting two-at-a-time toe up Magic Loop socks with the Fleegle Heel were what got me into making socks after earlier attempts that were barely wearable. Your marvelous videos restored my desire to make my own comfy foot coverings. I just finished over-the-knee (REALLY LONG!) socks and must now finish a pair to-the-knee I started sometime last year. Of all the tutorials I’ve ever watched, or all the books I have on socks, your instruction is absolutely the top of the heap!

    1. Wow, Norma, your words make me so happy! I want to print out that last sentence and frame it. Thank you, thank you. I cannot believe you’ve made knee socks AND over-the-knee-socks. That is FABULOUS.

      Love,
      Liat

  2. Janice Hamrick

    1st time kniter circular needles and doing toe up socks. Doing ok so far. Gust don’t know when to start the heal turn. My foot is 10in long. I need a lot of help.

  3. Janice Hamrick

    1st time kniter circular needles and doing toe up socks. Doing ok so far. Gust don’t know when to start the heal turn. My foot is 10in long.

  4. I’ve just finished a pair of toe-up socks and they’re too long in the foot!! Is there any way I can re-do the heel to make it smaller/shorter…? I’d rather not cut off the toe and some of the foot and re-do it from there….

    1. What to do may depend on how long the cuff of the sock is. If they are long cuffs and you don’t want to unravel, I have an idea that might be a totally cheater suggestion. If it were me I might use a sewing machine and sew a curved toe seam where the toe is “supposed” to be and then cut off the extra toe.

      If it is an ankle sock or a short-cuff sock you can of course unravel the sock to the foot and start the gusset increases sooner. But I think you’re saying you don’t want to do that?

      Let me know.

  5. OH HELP! What if the front of the ankle/leg that I am knitting for is not in this State, but is living far away???

  6. I am knitting socks for someone else who lives in another state, and it is a surprise gift. Isn’t there a simple chart somewhere that gives average measurements for how many inches of toe to knit before starting the Fleegle heel for men, women, and children?

  7. I am excited! I found a site that really helps you learn how to knit toe up socks! thank you! I think I can proceed with my toe up sock knitting.

  8. I did do them on dpns but I have a question. When you work the last row and use fleegle’s no hole do you decrease at the end of the heel/instep needle? Thanks.

    1. Sure Mags, just put the instep stitches on one DPN and divide the heel stitches over two DPNs. You’ll be working back-and-forth over the two DPNs – you can just pretend like they’re one needle. Just follow the directions in the pattern and don’t even worry about what kind of needles you’re using – it really doesn’t matter. Your stitches can’t tell the difference!

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