Knitted Dishcloth Pattern and How To Add a Single Crochet Border Onto Your Knitting

"But honey, you LIKE doing the dishes!"

Happy housewife doing dishes The first time my boyfriend said this to me I stared him down like a jungle cat narrowing in for the kill.

Misguided man-notions aside, why not make something you do anyway more enjoyable through knitting?

I've got two great easy projects for you that could revolve around doing dishes, if you so choose: the ubiquitous-for-a-good-reason Granny's Favorite Dishcloth, and the technique of crocheting a border around it or around anything else.

These two exercises will improve your all-around knitting and pattern-reading skills, whether you choose to make the dishcloth for yourself or give it as a gift... maybe to a deserving boyfriend.

Great Beginner Pattern: Granny's Favorite Dishcloth

basic knitted dishclothThis is a great pattern for beginners: after a basic garter-stitch scarf, this is the perfect next step for someone who has just learned how to knit.

For help with reading the pattern and understanding the abbreviations, please download the video knitting dictionary.

This is a traditional pattern whose designer is unknown. Here is a link to the pattern on Ravelry.

Materials: Sugar and Cream cotton yarn, US size 6 or 7 straight needles

Pattern Instructions:

Knitted Dishcloth with Handmade Soap CO 4 sts.
Row 1: K4.
Row 2: K2, YO, knit across row.
Repeat last row until you have 44 sts on the needle.
Next: K1, k2tog, YO, k2tog, k to end.
Repeat last row until you have 4 sts on the needle.
Bind off and either leave as-is or add one round of single crochet to the edge, making a loop of chain stitches in one corner to hang the cloth up when you are finished using it (see below).

Adding a Simple Crochet Border

And speaking of how to do a round of single crochet around your dishcloth, look no further!

Even if you don't know how to crochet, you can do this, because I show you every step.

Video Thumbnail

KNITFreedom - How To Add A Crochet Border To Knitting - Single Crochet Edging

"But honey, you LIKE doing the dishes!" The first time my boyfriend said this to me I stared him down like a jungle cat narrowing in for the kill. Misguided man-notions aside, why not make something you do anyway more enjoyable through knitting? I've got two great easy projects for you that could re

Related Tutorials:

If you liked this tutorial on how to add a crochet border to knitting, post in the comments!

 


Videos from this post:

Crochet Border on Knitting
Free Video
Video Thumbnail
Crochet Border on Knitting
Crochet Border on Knitting - youtube Video

30 thoughts on “Knitted Dishcloth Pattern and How To Add a Single Crochet Border Onto Your Knitting”

  1. I’m just going to bind off, cut it, and then do the border, because I can’t figure it out, it’s like you just leap forward since it’s just an optional thing anyway.

    1. Hi Sara,
      I’m really sorry for the confusion. Yes, you’re supposed to bind off the 4 remaining stitches and then add the crochet border if desired. I’ve updated the blog post to reflect the correct instructions. Thank you!

  2. You say instead of binding off, you can crochet the edging, but you don’t say or show how to involve or do it with the four live knit stitches that are left, and maybe it’s my Topamax fogging my brain, but I just can’t figure out anything other than a chain stitch with those, not a single crochet. I know it will probably be a duh moment once I see it, and I can probably look it up on YouTube, but I’m in the Beginner Superstar, and it feels odd to be looking something up somewhere else.

    Though I can, of course. And do refer to my Knitty Answer book from time to time, I have a Crochet Answer one around somewhere that possibly might answer this, not sure.

    But since you recommend it, I felt left hang with, how do I do that?

  3. Dear Liat
    I am a new knitter and crocheter …thankyou for all your free patterns.. please keep posting more as I find your explaination very clear

    Have a wonderful Christmas and a great year ahead

  4. I am a pretty seasoned knitter, but I have never slipped that first stitch. I prefer the look however, I see that you do not recommend slipping that stitch using garter stitch. Isn’t the dishcloth garter stitch?

    I also like using a reverse crochet stitch on necklines although it has been years since I have done this!

    1. Hi Judi,

      Good point! I have actually since revised my position on slipping the first stitch on garter stitch (and I’ve been remiss in updating my blog about it).

      Now I recommend slipping the first stitch purlwise with yarn in front before moving the yarn to the back and knitting across the row.

  5. Hello Liat I love knitting & crocheting I joined your site to see if you could help me to be come a faster knitter as I have been doing this for years now & still no faster,I have arthritis all over so I hope you can help me to improve thank you for your enjoyable classes.

  6. hi!,I love your writing very a lot! share we keep in touch more
    approximately your article on AOL? I need an expert in this house to
    unravel my problem. May be that’s you! Having a look forward to peer you.

  7. My daughter wanted to learn to knit. I started knitting just to help her when she has problems. I now like it more than her! I have tried several dish cloths and they all look like a kite not a square. My knitting is tighter when I start but loosens up as i get to the end. Is there anyway to tighten the stitches when i notice this or i just need more experience keeping constant tension?

    Thanks for any advice,

    Knitting Dad

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


The maximum upload file size: 12 MB.
You can upload: image.
Links to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and other services inserted in the comment text will be automatically embedded.

Scroll to Top